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dc.contributor.advisorWhite, Bonnie
dc.contributor.advisorSkinner, Leaneen_US
dc.contributor.advisorPatterson, Gordonen_US
dc.contributor.advisorSpencer, Williamen_US
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Bonitaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2008-09-09T22:34:20Z
dc.date.available2008-09-09T22:34:20Z
dc.date.issued2008-05-15en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10415/1059
dc.description.abstractThis study was designed to identify the level of stress among secondary business/marketing educators relating to administration, school climate, and resources that are associated with stress and to determine if business/marketing educators perceive they are receiving support from administration in dealing with factors that are associated with stress. Data were analyzed using SPSS 15.0 using the following statistical procedures: Descriptive, Multiple Regression, Multivariate Analysis of Variance (MANOVA) and Pearson Correlation. The majority of the participants were female (87.9%) who fell in the age group of 40-49 years of age (33.6%). The average number of years of teaching experience was 14 years, with the majority of the respondents teaching in county school systems (57%). Respondents reported that mild stress was due to school climate, mild to moderate stress was due to school administration and mild to moderate stress was due to resources. There was a significant difference (p<.05) in the relationship between stress due to school climate and the level of support received from administrators in dealing with school climate. There was a significant difference in the relationship between stress and resources and the level of support received from administrators in dealing with resources. No significant differences were found between self-reported personality type and the overall stress level reported for teaching, collegiality, school climate, administration and resources. However, significant differences were found in the relationship between overall stress level and the individual stress factors for administration, school climate, administration and resources. In this study, business/marketing educators indicated the need for stress management workshops through in-service or professional development programs, the implementation of coping strategies, and more administrative support in dealing with factors that cause stress.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectCurriculum and Teachingen_US
dc.titleFactors Contributing To Stress In Business/Marketing Educators Resulting From Administration, School Climate, and Resourcesen_US
dc.typeDissertationen_US
dc.embargo.lengthNO_RESTRICTIONen_US
dc.embargo.statusNOT_EMBARGOEDen_US


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