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dc.contributor.advisorWitte, Maria
dc.contributor.advisorWitte, Jamesen_US
dc.contributor.advisorGuarino, Anthonyen_US
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Giaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2008-09-09T22:34:26Z
dc.date.available2008-09-09T22:34:26Z
dc.date.issued2008-05-15en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10415/1066
dc.description.abstractEveryone has a preferred learning style. Knowing and understanding learning styles helps individuals learn more efficiently (Silver, Strong, & Perini, 1997). It also allows an individual to capitalize on their strengths and improve self-advocacy skills. In the learning environment, many educators are becoming aware that students' emotional intelligence should be incorporated and embraced in the classroom (Ashkanasy & Dasborough, 2003). When a student's emotional and social skills are addressed, academic achievement of the student increases and interpersonal relationships improve (Goleman, 1995). The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between learning styles and emotional intelligence among adult learners. This study was conducted using the Gregorc Style Delineator to measure the four mediation abilities of learning styles and the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT) for assessing the four branches of emotional intelligence. The sample for this study consisted of 111 participants, who were male and female undergraduate and graduate students, who were at least 19 years of age, and enrolled in a degree of study at this university. Collected data included the participant's gender, race, age, GPA, traditional or Non-Traditional students, education level, and major. Based on the analysis of the data from this study, the data suggests that there is no correlation between the four mediation abilities of the Gregorc Style Delineator and the four branches of emotional intelligence as measured by the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test. The data also concluded that there is no statistical difference between learning styles and emotional intelligence based on ethnicity, age, GPA, and gender. The results indicated that The Gregorc Style Delineator and the Mayer-Salovey- Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test measure two separate constructs. The Gregorc Style Delineator and the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test are not interchangeable instruments measuring constructs from the same domain.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectEducational Foundationsen_US
dc.subjectLeadership and Technologyen_US
dc.titleLearning Styles and Emotional Intelligence of the Adult Learneren_US
dc.typeDissertationen_US
dc.embargo.lengthNO_RESTRICTIONen_US
dc.embargo.statusNOT_EMBARGOEDen_US


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