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dc.contributor.advisorKowalski, Gregory
dc.contributor.advisorWeaver, Gregen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMolnar, Josephen_US
dc.contributor.authorSalvador, Ericen_US
dc.date.accessioned2008-09-09T22:35:25Z
dc.date.available2008-09-09T22:35:25Z
dc.date.issued2008-05-15en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10415/1128
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study is to investigate and examine perceptions of the criminal justice system and show its effects on juvenile delinquency. As the juvenile continues to engage in deviant behavior, the risk of being caught increases, thus instilling more negative perceptions toward the criminal justice system. Therefore, as deviant behavior increases, criminal behavior and potential for arrest will increase as well. Subsequently, if criminal behavior and the possibility for arrest both increase, the likelihood of contact with the criminal justice system will be similarly affected. This study will utilize Travis Hirschi?s Social Control Theory, while focusing specifically on the “Belief” component in his vi theory. The sample and data for this study is taken solely from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 Cohort. This research provides statistical evidence that the perceptions of the criminal justice system have an effect on Juvenile delinquency. The statistical significance of the findings and implications for future research are discussed.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectSociologyen_US
dc.titlePerceptions of Crime and Punishment: An Analysis of the Effect on Juvenile Delinquencyen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.embargo.lengthNO_RESTRICTIONen_US
dc.embargo.statusNOT_EMBARGOEDen_US


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