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dc.contributor.advisorMolnar, Joseph
dc.contributor.advisorBailey, Conneren_US
dc.contributor.advisorFields, Deacueen_US
dc.contributor.authorCui, Linaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2009-02-23T15:54:03Z
dc.date.available2009-02-23T15:54:03Z
dc.date.issued2008-12-15en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10415/1408
dc.description.abstractThe emergence of the term 'organic farming' describes a distinct system of agriculture compared to conventional or industrial agriculture. Since October 2002, farmers planning to market their products as ΄organic‘ must be certified following USDA procedures. But many farmers avoid certification costs and paperwork by selling their products as ΄natural‘ or ΄pesticide free‘. In Alabama, most producers, with small-scale farms, prefer to sell their ΄natural‘ or ΄organically-oriented‘ products directly to the consumers without USDA certification. But few studies focus on these farmers’ production and marketing needs and possibilities before. This study examines Alabama low-input and organic producers’ needs and concerns. It focuses on Alabama low-input and organically-oriented producers (LIOP) to describe the practices and approaches currently employed by LIOP; to assess the information and technical needs of LIOP; and to profile the marketing strategies used by LIOP.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.rightsEMBARGO_NOT_AUBURNen_US
dc.subjectAgricultural Economics and Rural Sociologyen_US
dc.titleGrowing Naturally in Alabama: Needs and Possibilitiesen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.embargo.lengthMONTHS_WITHHELD:12en_US
dc.embargo.statusEMBARGOEDen_US
dc.embargo.enddate2010-02-23en_US


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