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dc.contributor.advisorWickrama, Thulitha
dc.contributor.authorBanford, Alyssa
dc.date.accessioned2009-07-13T15:53:23Z
dc.date.available2009-07-13T15:53:23Z
dc.date.issued2009-07-13T15:53:23Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10415/1777
dc.description.abstractTo date, marital outcomes and family closeness following natural disasters have not been extensively investigated. Previous research indicates that disaster experiences relate to adverse mental health outcomes, and there is evidence suggesting that these effects persist over time. While the rise of family problems is documented in disaster research, marital satisfaction remains unreported on in disaster studies. In response to the adverse outcomes related to disaster, researchers have investigated what factors may be protective of mental health for disaster survivors. Religious coping is a prevalent topic in studies of trauma, stress, and disaster. The quality of coping employed tends to influence the outcomes realized. The purpose of the present study is to examine the relationships among physical health persisting form the 2004 Asian Tsunami, mental health outcomes, family closeness and marital satisfaction in Sri Lankan mothers. Secondarily, the moderating influence of religiosity on these relationships was also investigated. Each of these constructs was measured using self report instruments data were entered into a path analysis, where the data were examined.en
dc.rightsEMBARGO_NOT_AUBURNen
dc.subjectHuman Development and Family Studiesen
dc.titleThe Association Between Marital Functioning, Family Closeness, and Tsunami Related Health: Moderation by Religiosityen
dc.typethesisen
dc.embargo.lengthNO_RESTRICTIONen_US
dc.embargo.statusNOT_EMBARGOEDen_US


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