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dc.contributor.advisorMitchelson, Jacqueline
dc.contributor.advisorSvyantek, Daniel
dc.contributor.advisorEdwards, Bryan
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Jimmy
dc.date.accessioned2010-04-09T20:57:52Z
dc.date.available2010-04-09T20:57:52Z
dc.date.issued2010-04-09T20:57:52Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10415/2099
dc.description.abstractThe present study examined the moderating effects of racial identity centrality and performance goal orientation on the relationship between stereotype threat and test performance. I also assessed the extent to which test-taking motivation, test-taking anxiety, fairness, and perceived job-relatedness mediated the stereotype threat-test performance relationship. African-Americans were assigned to one of three conditions, all varying in the amount of associated stereotype threat, and given a cognitive ability test. Information concerning their individual racial identities, goal orientations, and perceptions of tests was collected. Results indicated that stereotype threat was not a statistically significant predictor of test performance. Additionally, none of the proposed moderators and mediators was statistically significant.en
dc.rightsEMBARGO_NOT_AUBURNen
dc.subjectPsychologyen
dc.titleAn Examination of Factors Hypothesized to Moderate Stereotype Threat Effects on the Raven's Advanced Progressive Matricesen
dc.typethesisen
dc.embargo.lengthNO_RESTRICTIONen_US
dc.embargo.statusNOT_EMBARGOEDen_US


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