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dc.contributor.advisorPittman, Joe
dc.contributor.authorSaint-Eloi Cadely, Hans
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-20T14:35:46Z
dc.date.available2010-10-20T14:35:46Z
dc.date.issued2010-10-20T14:35:46Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10415/2353
dc.description.abstractThe present study investigated the influence of identity styles and academic possible selves on academic outcomes for high school students. Specifically, the present study examined the relationship between identity styles and academic possible selves, the relationship of these two variables on academic outcomes, whether the relationship between academic possible selves and academic outcomes was mediated by the strategy time spent on homework, and whether academic possible selves mediated the relationship between identity styles and academic outcomes. Gender and ethnic differences in these variables and the relations among these variables also were examined. This study was conducted on a sample of 1,137 high school students from a variety of public schools across the State of Alabama. Overall, results indicated that the informational and diffuse-avoidant identity styles were related to academic possible selves in their expected direction, whereas the normative identity style was not related to academic possible selves in the full sample. The construct of academic possible selves was related to academic outcomes, however, time spent on homework was not a mediator to this relationship. All three identity styles were related to academic outcomes in their expected direction, and academic possible selves mediated the relationship between some of these variables. Furthermore, girls reported higher levels of an informational identity style, whereas boys endorsed higher levels of a diffuse-avoidant identity style. No gender differences were shown in the relations among these constructs. In regards to ethnic differences, African-Americans endorsed higher levels of a normative identity style than did European-Americans. Unexpectedly however, the normative identity style was found to be related to academic possible selves for European-Americans, but not for African-Americans. Limitations and contributions of the present study are also discussed.en
dc.rightsEMBARGO_NOT_AUBURNen
dc.subjectHuman Development and Family Studiesen
dc.titleThe Role of Identity Styles and Academic Possible Selves on Academic Outcomes for High School Studentsen
dc.typethesisen
dc.embargo.lengthNO_RESTRICTIONen_US
dc.embargo.statusNOT_EMBARGOEDen_US


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