Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorLewis, Philip
dc.contributor.advisorCobb, Marshell G.en_US
dc.contributor.advisorO'Leary, Virginiaen_US
dc.contributor.authorWynn, Jenniferen_US
dc.date.accessioned2008-09-09T21:15:39Z
dc.date.available2008-09-09T21:15:39Z
dc.date.issued2006-08-15en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10415/250
dc.description.abstractIt is important to study bitterness among workers because the consequences of becoming bitter may be detrimental to both the organization and the individual worker. A questionnaire was developed to measure bitterness which included the constructs of avoidance, frustration, job satisfaction, negative affect, powerlessness, and rumination. Data analysis showed that the data fit the model well. Significant differences were seen among Bitter and Not Bitter participants in how they responded to questions about frustration, job satisfaction, powerlessness, and rumination. Over thirty-two percent of the participants reported they were bitter as a result of mistreatment at work, which could lead to several negative emotional and behavioral consequences at work.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectPsychologyen_US
dc.titleDefining Bitterness in the Workplaceen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.embargo.lengthNO_RESTRICTIONen_US
dc.embargo.statusNOT_EMBARGOEDen_US


Files in this item

Show simple item record