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dc.contributor.advisorCorreia, Christopher
dc.contributor.advisorGillis, Jennifer
dc.contributor.advisorMattson, Richard
dc.contributor.authorSilvestri, Mark
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-05T15:52:00Z
dc.date.available2011-07-05T15:52:00Z
dc.date.issued2011-07-05
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10415/2654
dc.description.abstractAlcohol consumption on college campuses is a prevalent activity, with over half of college students reporting alcohol consumption at least once in the past month, and it embodies “binge” drinking, consuming 4 (5 for males) drinks in a single sitting. One contributor to binge drinking on college campuses is the drinking game. These games include a set of rules that require players to consume alcohol if they fail at the game. The following study examined blood alcohol concentrations (BAC) associated with the popular college drinking game “beer pong,” as well as differences in liquid consumed (water or beer), gender, consumption levels, BAC measurements, participants’ desire to consume alcohol, and their subjective experiences during the lab sessions. Results indicated that game play differed by type of beverage served and gender. The results also suggest that estimates of BAC may not provide an accurate indication of actual BAC during drinking game session.en_US
dc.rightsEMBARGO_NOT_AUBURNen_US
dc.subjectPsychologyen_US
dc.titleExamining Blood Alcohol Concentrations Through a Simulated Drinking Game Procedureen_US
dc.typethesisen_US
dc.embargo.lengthNO_RESTRICTIONen_US
dc.embargo.statusNOT_EMBARGOEDen_US


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