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dc.contributor.advisorJackson, John
dc.contributor.advisorThompson, Henry
dc.contributor.advisorBeil, Richard
dc.contributor.authorKinyua, Peter
dc.date.accessioned2011-08-03T20:32:07Z
dc.date.available2011-08-03T20:32:07Z
dc.date.issued2011-08-03
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10415/2749
dc.description.abstractThe causes of rising demand pull inflation in South Africa are examined with an eye on the international price of gold given the importance of gold mining in the country. Effects of the money supply, exchange rate, foreign income, and an index of political stability are included in the model, with results showing exchange rates and the price of gold to be the major determining factors of inflation levels. Immigration of highly skilled workers from developed countries lower the marginal productivity, and emigration of highly skilled workers have the opposite effects. Depreciation of the Rand makes raw gold more affordable thereby raising supply. A higher cross price elasticity between labor and both capital and energy makes investment in new technology a feasible idea for mine owners. In addition, there is little motivation to commission new mines or re-open closed ones, which often adversely impact the environment.en_US
dc.rightsEMBARGO_GLOBALen_US
dc.subjectEconomicsen_US
dc.titleEconomic Impacts of Gold Production in South Africaen_US
dc.typethesisen_US
dc.embargo.lengthMONTHS_WITHHELD:24en_US
dc.embargo.statusEMBARGOEDen_US
dc.embargo.enddate2013-08-03en_US


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