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dc.contributor.advisorPipes, Randolph
dc.contributor.authorSpragg, Christina
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-19T20:28:17Z
dc.date.available2011-10-19T20:28:17Z
dc.date.issued2011-10-19
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10415/2820
dc.description.abstractThe current study used a true experimental design, with wait-list control, to determine if the Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) program would increase levels of mindfulness, self-awareness, and empathy, while decreasing levels of burnout among graduate level mental health service providers-in-training. Self-report measures were used to assess the dependent variables before the start of the MBSR program, at completion of the program, and four weeks after the MBSR program ended. Data from 16 total participants (8 in each group) were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVAs with a between-subjects factor. Results indicated that the MBSR program did not lead to an increase in levels of mindfulness, self-awareness, or empathy, or a decrease in burnout for the treatment group. Information regarding the nature of the stressors encountered by graduate level mental health service providers-in-training was obtained.en_US
dc.rightsEMBARGO_NOT_AUBURNen_US
dc.subjectCounseling Psychologyen_US
dc.titleThe Impact of Mindfulness Practice on Mental Health Service Providers-in-Training: An Examination of Mindfulness, Self-Awareness, Empathy, and Burnouten_US
dc.typedissertationen_US
dc.embargo.lengthNO_RESTRICTIONen_US
dc.embargo.statusNOT_EMBARGOEDen_US


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