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dc.contributor.advisorLaband, David
dc.contributor.authorTanger, Shaun
dc.date.accessioned2012-04-17T20:12:10Z
dc.date.available2012-04-17T20:12:10Z
dc.date.issued2012-04-17
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10415/3026
dc.description.abstractWe investigate empirically the importance of a conjectured linkage between economic conditions and increasing party divergence with respect to national-level environmental policy in the United States. Using data from 1970-2008, we find that increases in the rate of unemployment are associated with increases in divergence between the two parties with respect to voting on environmental legislation; a result that is consistent for both the House and Senate. We also report evidence of a positive relationship between party divergence on environmental legislation and real per capita income. We fail to observe evidence of a statistically significant relationship between the rate of inflation and divergence on environmental voting.en_US
dc.rightsEMBARGO_NOT_AUBURNen_US
dc.subjectEconomicsen_US
dc.titleParty Polarization: Congressional Divergence on Environmental Policy from 1970-2008en_US
dc.typethesisen_US
dc.embargo.lengthNO_RESTRICTIONen_US
dc.embargo.statusNOT_EMBARGOEDen_US


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