Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorDagley, John
dc.contributor.advisorGuarino, Anthonyen_US
dc.contributor.advisorStadler, Hollyen_US
dc.contributor.authorPeebles, Scotten_US
dc.date.accessioned2008-09-09T21:16:23Z
dc.date.available2008-09-09T21:16:23Z
dc.date.issued2006-08-15en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10415/313
dc.description.abstractThe Narcissistic Personality Inventory (NPI) and its factors have been shown to simultaneously predict both psychological adjustment and lack thereof. Results from a host of empirical studies suggest that although one particular NPI factor predicts poorer adjustment and psychological functioning on a consistent basis, the other three factors predict varying levels of psychological health and adjustment. The present study sought to examine the predictive ability of the NPI and its factors in relation to existentially-oriented measures of psychological functioning. One hundred and ninety individuals completed the NPI and several existential construct measures (e.g., purpose in life, self-actualization, and death anxiety). The regression analyses demonstrate that the NPI and its factors indeed differentially predict psychological health and adjustment on these existential measures. These findings support an existential conceptualization of narcissism that focuses on the relative adaptivity of a narcissistic character structure and a dimensional view of personality functioning. This conceptualization is consistent with traditional counseling psychology values and beliefs.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectCounseling Psychologyen_US
dc.subjectCounselor Educationen_US
dc.subjectSchool Psychologyen_US
dc.titleAn Empirical and Existential Examination of Narcissistic Functioningen_US
dc.typeDissertationen_US
dc.embargo.lengthNO_RESTRICTIONen_US
dc.embargo.statusNOT_EMBARGOEDen_US


Files in this item

Show simple item record