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dc.contributor.advisorWalton, William C.
dc.contributor.advisorDavis, Donald A.
dc.contributor.advisorSupan, John E.
dc.contributor.authorDavis, Julie
dc.date.accessioned2013-03-27T18:45:16Z
dc.date.available2013-03-27T18:45:16Z
dc.date.issued2013-03-27
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10415/3502
dc.description.abstractIn recent years, as demand has risen, interest has grown in diversifying Alabama’s oyster harvest to include oysters for the premium half shell market. The adjustable long-line system (ALS) can be used to grow oysters with the attributes necessary to compete in this high-value market. ALS baskets can be configured in two ways, cross-line or in-line. The cross-line arrangement allows 33% more baskets to fit within the same space. In conjunction with a test of stocking density (75, 90, or 105 oysters per basket), we tested the effects of these two basket arrangements on product quality. Lower densities and cross-line arrangement yielded oysters with more desirable product attributes (i.e. cup, fan, meat quality). Basket arrangement and stocking density did not significantly effect Polydora websteri infestation or shell strength. Placing nine baskets, each with 75 oysters, per bay appears to be the best way to optimize ALS production.en_US
dc.rightsEMBARGO_NOT_AUBURNen_US
dc.subjectFisheries and Allied Aquaculturesen_US
dc.titleEffects of basket arrangement and stocking density when using the adjustable long-line system for oyster grow-outen_US
dc.typethesisen_US
dc.embargo.lengthNO_RESTRICTIONen_US
dc.embargo.statusNOT_EMBARGOEDen_US


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