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dc.contributor.advisorKetring, Scott
dc.contributor.advisorAdler-Baeder, Francesca
dc.contributor.advisorSmith, Thomas
dc.contributor.authorEspinoza Rangel, Reyna
dc.date.accessioned2013-07-10T16:20:17Z
dc.date.available2013-07-10T16:20:17Z
dc.date.issued2013-07-10
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10415/3700
dc.description.abstractResearch has supported the association between spirituality and relationship satisfaction, whereby more spiritual individuals are more satisfied with their romantic relationships. However, it remains unclear why spirituality benefits romantic relationships. Addressing this gap in the literature, the current study uses a guided theoretical framework and tests whether prayer for the partner is an intervening variable underlying this link. Using data from a diverse sample, this study drew upon measures of self-reported spirituality, prayer for the partner, and relationship satisfaction to test the association between spirituality and relationship satisfaction and whether prayer for the partner was an intervening factor in this relationship. The sample consisted of 286 individuals in a romantic relationship. Regression analyses supported the positive association between prayer for the partner and relationship satisfaction in men and women, but provided no support for the association between spirituality and relationship satisfaction. No mediation or moderation effects were found. Possible explanations for these findings, implication for practice, and future directions are provided.en_US
dc.rightsEMBARGO_NOT_AUBURNen_US
dc.subjectHuman Development and Family Studiesen_US
dc.titleSpirituality and Relationship Satisfaction: The Role of Prayeren_US
dc.typethesisen_US
dc.embargo.lengthMONTHS_WITHHELD:6en_US
dc.embargo.statusEMBARGOEDen_US
dc.embargo.enddate2014-01-10en_US


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