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dc.contributor.advisorWitte, Mariaen_US
dc.contributor.authorMoussa, Nahlaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-23T16:01:40Z
dc.date.available2015-07-23T16:01:40Z
dc.date.issued2015-07-23
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10415/4715
dc.description.abstractToday, adoption of innovative technology is an important subject for research and work. Recent research discussed the importance of integrating modern technology into teaching and learning environments in higher education settings (Aucoin, 2014; Fisher, Worley & Fernandez, 2012; Kajuna, 2009). Learning styles of individuals also play an important role in the learning process (Cassidy, 2004; Dunn & Dunn, 1998). This study examined the learning styles of undergraduate and graduate students at a Southeastern University and their perceptions of Web 2.0 technologies through using the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) and the Index of Learning Styles (ILS) instrument. Learning styles, age and gender were independent variables that were examined to see if they affect the perceptions of Web 2.0 technologies among the students. Results indicated that students had different learning styles; however, the majority were sensing, visual, and sequential learners. Students had moderate perceptions of Web 2.0 technologies. Correlational analysis was conducted to examine the relationship between learning styles and age and Web 2.0 perceptions. The analysis revealed that there was no correlation between learning styles and Web 2.0 perceptions; however, age had a positive correlation with Web 2.0 perceptions. A T-test for independent samples was conducted to examine if there was any difference in Web 2.0 perceptions among students based on gender. The results indicated that there was no difference in Web 2.0 perceptions based on gender. Additional findings revealed that the students’ level of education had a significant effect on their Web 2.0 perceptions. Graduate students had more positive perceptions of Web 2.0 technologies than undergraduate students. A Multiple regression analysis technique was used to examine relationships among the subscales of the TAM, which were perceived ease of use (PEOU), perceived usefulness (PU), and behavioral intention (BI), and their perceptions of Web 2.0 technologies. Findings revealed that PEOU, PU and BI were highly correlated and PEOU and PU were a good predictor of BI towards Web 2.0 tools than PU. The t-test for independent samples was conducted to examine the effect of level of education on technology perceptions. Data revealed that graduate students had a higher perception and behavioral intentions toward Web 2.0 tools than undergraduate students.en_US
dc.subjectEducation Foundation, Leadership, and Technologyen_US
dc.titleExamination of Learning Styles and Technology Perceptions among Higher Education Studentsen_US
dc.typeDissertationen_US
dc.embargo.statusNOT_EMBARGOEDen_US


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