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dc.contributor.advisorWaters, Matthew
dc.contributor.authorMetz, Alexander
dc.date.accessioned2019-05-14T15:19:12Z
dc.date.available2019-05-14T15:19:12Z
dc.date.issued2019-05-14
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10415/6731
dc.description.abstractCoastal estuaries are a vital resource that provide many environmental and socioeconomic benefits. Despite their value, increased anthropogenic influence has resulted in ecosystem degradation due to eutrophication in coastal estuaries. This study utilizes paleolimnological techniques and spatial analysis to determine the history and extent of anthropogenic impact in a Gulf of Mexico estuary system. The results indicate a significant increase in nutrient, element, and photopigment deposition with increasing anthropogenic influence. Eutrophication was driven by a multiplicity of drivers, but nutrient loading and hydrologic alteration have had the greatest effect on primary producer ecology. Spatial analysis suggests sediment nutrient concentrations are heavily influenced by nearby land-use and point source pollution although variables tied to freshwater inflow such as flow rate, dissolved organic carbon, and salinity appear to have a greater impact on the spatial distribution of phytoplankton communities and abundance.en_US
dc.rightsEMBARGO_GLOBALen_US
dc.subjectCrop Soils and Environmental Sciencesen_US
dc.titleSpatiotemporal Analysis of Ecosystem Degradation in a Gulf of Mexico Estuary Systemen_US
dc.typeMaster's Thesisen_US
dc.embargo.lengthMONTHS_WITHHELD:24en_US
dc.embargo.statusEMBARGOEDen_US
dc.embargo.enddate2021-05-07en_US
dc.contributor.committeeBurton, Christopher
dc.contributor.committeeShepherd, Stephanie
dc.contributor.committeeBrantley, Eve


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