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dc.contributor.advisorBlashfield, Roger
dc.contributor.advisorKatz, Jeffreyen_US
dc.contributor.advisorLazarte, Alejandroen_US
dc.contributor.authorKeeley, Jareden_US
dc.date.accessioned2008-09-09T21:21:33Z
dc.date.available2008-09-09T21:21:33Z
dc.date.issued2005-08-15en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10415/684
dc.description.abstractThe organization of mental disorders by clinicians can be viewed as a type of folk taxonomy. If this is true, the organizations of clinicians should exhibit certain properties; specifically, they should be hierarchical. This hierarchical nature is implicit in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders – Fourth Edition (DSM-IV), which is the current organizational standard in the field of mental health. This study examined the organizations of three samples of clinicians: two expert samples (N = 7 and 21, respectively) and one novice sample (N = 13). The results indicate that clinicians do organize mental disorders in a hierarchical fashion, but not to the degree found in the DSM-IV. Remarkably, clinicians of varying experience and geographic location tested under separate methodological conditions produced the same hierarchical pattern.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectPsychologyen_US
dc.titleAnalysis of the Hierarchical Nature of Clinicians’ Organization of Mental Disordersen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.embargo.lengthNO_RESTRICTIONen_US
dc.embargo.statusNOT_EMBARGOEDen_US


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