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dc.contributor.advisorShapiro, Steven
dc.contributor.authorMiller, Melissa
dc.date.accessioned2020-03-31T18:32:34Z
dc.date.available2020-03-31T18:32:34Z
dc.date.issued2020-03-31
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10415/7096
dc.description.abstractSCT has been identified as a distinct construct but highly related to ADHD. SCT also often co-occurs with internalizing disorders. In adults, SCT is associated with interpersonal problems, and the way individuals respond to interpersonal stress is related to further mental health problems. The current study evaluated whether SCT predicted stress responses when controlling for ADHD and internalizing symptoms. Undergraduates (N =412) from Auburn University completed an online survey. SCT was positively related to disengagement coping (voluntary efforts to avoid stressors), involuntary disengagement (involuntary responses acting away from stressors), and involuntary engagement (involuntary responses oriented toward the stressors) and negatively related to primary control coping (responses that act upon/work toward changing the stressors or environment) and secondary control coping (effortful responses to adapt to stressors). Using hierarchical regression analyses, SCT remained a unique predictor of primary control coping and involuntary disengagement. The current study highlights a need to evaluate for symptoms of SCT in individuals that appear to respond to stress in potentially maladaptive ways.en_US
dc.rightsEMBARGO_GLOBALen_US
dc.subjectPsychologyen_US
dc.titleDo Symptoms of Sluggish Cognitive Tempo Uniquely Predict Response to Interpersonal Stress in College Students?en_US
dc.typeMaster's Thesisen_US
dc.embargo.lengthMONTHS_WITHHELD:12en_US
dc.embargo.statusEMBARGOEDen_US
dc.embargo.enddate2021-03-29en_US


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