This Is AuburnElectronic Theses and Dissertations

The Association Between Race Based Traumatic Stress Symptoms, Academic Self-Efficacy, and Social Support in Black University Students

Date

2020-11-23

Author

Phillips, Kayla

Type of Degree

PhD Dissertation

Department

Special Education, Rehabilitation, Counseling

Restriction Status

EMBARGOED

Restriction Type

Full

Date Available

11-23-2021

Abstract

A substantial body of research has examined the unique yet difficult experiences of Black students at predominantly White institutions (PWIs). This study (N= 99) builds on previous research to examine the association between race based traumatic stress symptoms, academic self-efficacy, and social support in Black students attending a PWI. Specifically, the study attempted to determine if there was an association between Black students who experience race based traumatic stress symptoms and their levels of academic self-efficacy. The study also explored whether tailored social support moderated the relationship between race based traumatic stress symptoms and academic self-efficacy. It was hypothesized that higher symptoms of race based traumatic stress will predict lower academic self-efficacy in Black students, tailored and general social support will positively predict academic self-efficacy in Black students and moderate the relationship between race based traumatic stress symptoms and academic self-efficacy. A hierarchical multiple regression analysis was used to analyze the data and results indicated mixed findings. Clinical implications and directions for future research are discussed.