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dc.contributor.advisorWyss, Hilary
dc.contributor.advisorRoozen, Kevinen_US
dc.contributor.advisorRyan, Jamesen_US
dc.contributor.authorPojasek, Melissaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2008-09-09T21:22:59Z
dc.date.available2008-09-09T21:22:59Z
dc.date.issued2007-05-15en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10415/781
dc.description.abstractIn its most basic form, literacy is just a knowledge of letters; it was (and remains today) a basic goal of primary education. The early American educational system is intriguing because of its subtle ways of reinforcing social roles, especially in regards to women’s education. In the late eighteenth century, women were simply seen as convenient vehicles for the transmission of literacy to younger (especially male) generations. I argue that some women, such as Judith Sargent Murray, were not only aware of these obstacles, but used them in an effort to attain intellectual, social, and political freedom.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectEnglishen_US
dc.title'That Minds Are Not Alike': Implications of Gendered Literacy and Education in Revolutionary Americaen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.embargo.lengthNO_RESTRICTIONen_US
dc.embargo.statusNOT_EMBARGOEDen_US


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