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dc.contributor.advisorAdams, Garry
dc.contributor.authorNewman, Christine
dc.date.accessioned2019-04-03T16:27:49Z
dc.date.available2019-04-03T16:27:49Z
dc.date.issued2019-04-03
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10415/6576
dc.description.abstractThe distribution of structural power in the upper echelons is unequal, but more so for females and racial minorities in the C-suite (Kulich, Trojanowski, Ryan, Haslam & Renneboog, 2011). Discrimination towards females and racial minorities is of interest to scholars, practitioners, and government entities. Although discrimination is illegal, there are many forms of overt discrimination that negatively impact these individuals. Using S&P 500 companies, this dissertation examines the distribution of structural power to females and racial minorities in the C-suite through the lens of social dominance theory. Several moderated relationships are also examined using CEO and board of director diversity in gender and race to examine the distribution of structural power to females and racial minorities in the C-suite. Findings indicate that structural power is distributed unequally to females and racial minorities in the TMT and that the presence of an in-group CEO can decrease the unequal distribution of power to TMT members.en_US
dc.rightsEMBARGO_GLOBALen_US
dc.subjectManagementen_US
dc.titlePower in the upper echelons: Females, racial minorities and the distribution of poweren_US
dc.typePhD Dissertationen_US
dc.embargo.lengthMONTHS_WITHHELD:25en_US
dc.embargo.statusEMBARGOEDen_US
dc.embargo.enddate2021-05-03en_US


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